Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Leicester at Grace Road
#41
With the pears facing almost certain relegation again wonder if they will be added toWB's hit list, we could have a triumvirate +3and I see 1of the triumvirate has sneezed into 4th place ahead of the mighty Middlesex
Reply
#42
At this rate, we will struggle to play Worcestershire for a while which is a pity having won 4 doubles over them in succession in the CC. This is one of the things I did not like when we changed to two divisions but I suppose it was inevitable at some stage.
Reply
#43
(13-09-2018, 06:58 PM)narsty simon Wrote: With the pears facing almost certain relegation again wonder if they will be added toWB's hit list, we could have a triumvirate +3and I see 1of the triumvirate has sneezed into 4th place ahead of the mighty Middlesex

Good point... I think Sussex, Somerset and possibly Worcestershire would benefit from a stable and competitive championship played across the whole year.

I have a lot of time for Somerset... They have for years contributed to all formats of the game. I have some great memories of seeing them in some early eighties show piece Lords finals..... and indeed us beating them at Lords a few seasons ago in a final (and yes I was there .... Where the tavern bar used to be).
Reply
#44
Me too, lovely people and great venue
Reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes narsty simon's post:
Warleybear
#45
Indeed Simon ....
Reply
#46
There's a lot of nostalgia in many of these posts, harking back to the days when "red-ball" cricket was the most important part of the game.  That's changed.  "White-ball" cricket earns the revenue, provides the funding for secondary "red-ball" cricket to survive and is, and will be, the driving force behind global expansion.
Whingeing about organisations that prioritise the most popular parts of their business is like retreating to the comfort of the womb.  To pick on one of the much-maligned counties, the virtually debt-free Northamptonshire, perhaps someone might like to produce a business plan to persuade them to prioritise "red-ball cricket".  Given that one T20 on a pleasant evening will produce a 5,000 plus crowd and £100,000 revenue and that promotion to Division One will make absolutely no difference to revenue, either at the gate or in membership receipts, I look forward to seeing the ingenious solutions that will be forthcoming.
Please remember that two of the "poor" counties that have won the T20 have produced David Willey, Ollie Stone, Ben Duckett, Stuart Broad, Zak Chappell, Harry Gurney and Richard Gleeson, all of whom have played "red-ball" cricket this season (or next) for International hosting counties.  I'd have mentioned Craig Miles and Liam Norwell but Gloucestershire aren't "poor" enough to have done better than finish runners-up in the T20 so don't really qualify.
I love "red-ball" cricket; I've watched four consecutive days of Championship cricket this week at three different venues.  But I don't delude myself into thinking that it's the most important branch of the game.  Perhaps the Test Match Championship will provide a boost to that form of cricket in the countries where interest in that form has been diminishing.  But it won't alter the fact that the past was red and the present, and future, is white.
Reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes Austinbull's post:
Warleybear
#47
Good post Austell ... I don't pick on one. I suggest that there are a handful who would be better suited to white ball cricket and seem to have prioritiesed that already. Of course no county could remotely suggest that it was their official policy. Nothing more than a commercial and competitive Leics or Glous would please me .... But not drag down the championship by feeling they have to be in it. So what do we do....create a division three (a nursery red ball league) with promotion or relegation between that and the higher tier decided every few years on comulative positions if the county wants it.... a sort of pyramid outside the white ball structure?
Reply
#48
T20 cricket does not mean that it is the most important format of the game just because financially it keeps the whole game going. That is like saying "Why bother with this red-ball rubbish as no one watches it". Northamptonshire have said on many occasions that 3 good wash outs on T20 Friday nights would wipe out any chance of a profit for that particular season. No one is deluding themselves about CC or 4 day cricket but that is what produces the real cricketers of the world, Test cricketers. It is not a nostalgia trip, that is just the format that some of prefer whilst knowing that it produces hardly any income. Take away any form of first-class cricket and what we would be left with is a dull game which we would soon be bored with. If all we had was T20, loads of people would drift from the game as the thought of just seeing bully-boy batsmen with strike rates of 250-300 would soon get boring and we would basically have nothing else up our sleeves to bring people back. I get fed up with hearing about global expansion when all it means is trying to get some other non-cricketing country to play T20 and all this tosh I hear about "Getting kids into cricket" just means getting kids to watch T20 whilst they turn their noses up at first-class cricket. If you look at any T20 game and see the reaction of 'Kids' whilst the game is going on, some are running up and down the steps between seats, some are on their phones and some and others are not even facing the same direction of the match that is in front of them. Of course 'Red-ball cricket'(I hate that term) is the most important form as it produces the best players and anyone who thinks otherwise just because it doesn't bring in lots of dosh is misguided. I will rue the day that any T20 'Specialist' is called a great player. First class cricket of some sort would survive without T20 but if all we had was T20, the crowds would soon get bored through overkill and the game would die fairly quickly.
Reply
[-] The following 3 users Like paulbear's post:
Leicester Exile, narsty simon, rednalbear
#49
As long as the ECB say they are committed to Test cricket, then First Class cricket performs the role of developing and nurturing Test cricketers; no other form of cricket can do that.

With regards of getting kids into (Non-T20) cricket, well that can only happen if the opportunity is there. When Championship matches are scheduled properly, the crowds, including kids, will turn up (On the rare occasions when Championship matches are sensibly scheduled, the crowds are decent; not T20 levels but not the "One man and his dog" levels that the Championship's detractors often laugh about either.) As I like numbers, I decided to check how many days that kids in Birmingham could potentially see championship action at Edgbaston this year, crosschecking the scheduled dates against Birmingham City schools term dates; as you would expect the numbers are pitiful:

WCCC v Sussex Friday 13/04/18 - Monday 16/04/18 - 3 days possible
WCCC v Derbyshire Thursday 03/05/18 - Sunday 06/05/18 - 2 days possible
WCCC v Northants Friday 11/05/18 - Monday 14/05/18 - 2 days possible
WCCC v Glamorgan Saturday 09/06/18 - Tuesday 12/06/18 - 2 days possible
WCCC v Glos Sunday 19/08/18 - Wednesday 22/08/18 - 4 days possible (School holidays)
WCCC v Durham Tuesday 04/09/18 - Friday 07/09/18 - 0 days possible
WCCC v Kent - Monday 24/09/18 - Thursday 27/09/18 0 days possible

Which adds up to a mere 13 days of First Class cricket available to kids in an entire summer (Out of a total of just 28 days all together) When one deducts days lost to the weather, or where there is no play as the match has been concluded, that is pathetic. The problem is not that it is difficult to get people to come and watch Championship cricket, the problem is that the ECB, for whatever reason, have totally marginalised their own First Class competition.
Bears fan, Wolves fan, blood red Socialist, a not so vital statistician...
Reply
[-] The following 5 users Like randombear's post:
Leicester Exile, narsty simon, parkfield bear, paulbear, rednalbear
#50
Nice research randombear. Another annoying thing is now that schools are back, there is no chance of any child being able to watch CC. Why, because those useless fixture compilers have decided that the last 4 rounds of CC cricket should be played on week days. So any child who likes CC cricket and would love to see a vital game where they lift the title in front of their supporters, TOUGH, YOU WILL BE SITTING IN FRONT OF TEACHER WHILST IT ALL HAPPENS ELSEWHERE.
Reply
[-] The following 2 users Like paulbear's post:
Leicester Exile, randombear
#51
Yes... good analysis.... but how many overs of white ball cricket were bowled at Edgbaston in August? Three games... around 109 overs.

Whatever the format, there is too little cricket played at weekends, bank holidays or other holiday periods during summer. We've been lucky with the weather today.... but it would seem even T20 finals day is on its way to October. Do cricketers like playing regular cricket in the summer?

Expanding T20 into new areas is not tosh by the way.... it is a format that would generate interest in some of the cricketing deserts of the country based on some Lords, industrialists and gentlemen farmers back in 188X. It is also a format that some of the smaller current counties seem to prefer.

We will soon be at the tipping point at Edgbaston where there are mire T20 season ticket holders than members.....and I suspect that on fully paid memberships, that line has already been crossed. How many members are there and how many are young enough to pay the full rate? It is time for T20 supporters to be given a vote and a membership area.

Finally are we heading to one of the great scisms? Football and Rugby (Ellis running with the ball), Rugby Union and league, or the 1064 schism of the Catholic church and the Orthodox church etc.?

Interesting times and loads of questions....
Reply
#52
Friday-Sat-Sun-Monday would be an ideal model for county cricket in fact for both the main formats now.

The season lasts from early April through late September now so that gives potentially 24 such slots. But early April is too early and late September is too late so really it should be 22 slots.

14 of those slots need to be for Championship matches and for all sorts of reasons we need a balanced fixture list with more games in the height of summer than we've had of late. (April-May 5 fixtures) (June-July 4 fixtures) (August-September 5 fixtures)

The other 8 slots can be for T20 (May-June 3 weekends) (July-August 3 weekends) (late August slot) and they should play 2 matches per week of this format with games Thursday night in London, Friday night in other big cities, Saturday afternoons at the smaller county grounds and a full round of games on Sunday afternoon for all 18 counties too. Plus give Sky TV the option of having a few London/South East based games on a few Mondays, Tuesdays or Wednesdays. If that means some London based sides have more T20 home matches than (say) Durham then so be it.

Tuesday/Wednesday during the 14 Championship slots use for 50 over mini groups then knockout games May through July - 5 groups of 20 teams if we add Scotland and Netherlands. QF SF in June Final in July.

But the main thing is to have a schedule which has games even when there is a major event like Lord's Final and T20 Finals Day and simply move any affected counties fixtures to start Monday

I get the feeling very little thought is actually given to designing the county schedule especially with the vanity projects the ECB conduct (100 balls).
Reply
#53
"Another annoying thing is now that schools are back, there is no chance of any child being able to watch CC. Why, because those useless fixture compilers have decided that the last 4 rounds of CC cricket should be played on week days."

Precisely; the climax of the season and it is scheduled so as few people can watch it as possible!


"Whatever the format, there is too little cricket played at weekends, bank holidays or other holiday periods during summer. We've been lucky with the weather today.... but it would seem even T20 finals day is on its way to October. Do cricketers like playing regular cricket in the summer?"

Warley I disagree with you sometimes but you are bang on here; the number of free days at weekends is nothing short of a disgrace. Cricket should be scheduled every Saturday and Sunday during the season in my opinion, with rest days falling in the week. I agree, I wouldn't fancy watching cricket at 21:00 in England at this time of year.


"I get the feeling very little thought is actually given to designing the county schedule especially with the vanity projects the ECB conduct (100 balls). "

Very little thought? That's more than I would give them credit for!
Bears fan, Wolves fan, blood red Socialist, a not so vital statistician...
Reply
#54
Well done Worcestershire. That said its obvious that you are concentrating on white ball cricket and having been relegated from division 1 of the county championship you no longer have the right to infest the fine red ball game. We will take Cox, Clarke, Brown and Moeen and you will be closed down.
Reply
#55
Actually Worcs do try at both formats..... unlike some.

Anyway ... congratulations to them for winning in what looked like another great Edgbaston finals day.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)