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T20 - Fact from Fiction
#1
I've followed and enjoyed the discussions about the T20 matches so far.
As the (cleaned up version of the) saying goes, opinions are like navels.  We all have them.  I may like mine more than I like yours; but that's my privilege.
It does seem to me that some of the opinions about the T20 Blast at Edgbaston are soundly based on the truth whereas others are based on facts that are a little bit shaky.
I try to keep up with these things so, sticking strictly to the facts as I believe them to be, I thought it might be worth pointing out the following:

Ticket prices
T20 ticket prices are exactly the same as last year - £15 in the early bird window, £19 until midnight on the preceding day and £23 on the day.  Under-16s are free at all times.  The prices went up by £1 at the start of 2016. Because the competition didn't start until July, the early bird window actually lasted twice as long this year.

Crowd attendances
Two T20 group games at Edgbaston in 2016 had attendances of more than 9,000 (Worcestershire Rapids and Notts Outlaws).  So far this year, both of the two opening games have had attendances over 9,000.

Starting times
There were several reasons for the decision to start matches at 7.00pm
Firstly, there was quite a lot of feedback from spectators after last season that there is still too much traffic around Birmingham city centre and Edgbaston at 6.30pm which was the start time last year.
Secondly, two of the evening games are being shown on Sky straight after play completes in a Test match, which makes a 7pm start essential.
With all evening games this year falling on a Friday or Saturday, it was believed by the club that starting the Sky games at one time and the others at a different time would have been confusing.

Of course, based on the above, it's possible to have all sorts of opinions - that the ticket prices are too high/too low, that crowd attendances are great/disgracefully low/could or could not be improved, that starting times are better/worse than last year, etc. 
But even in this era of alternative facts, it may be worth starting with us all agreeing on a few truths before we diverge into the range of opinions that keep this board alive.
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#2
Thanks for the correct (I trust you!) information.

WHile I agree it's a good idea to have a discounted pre-booked price £23 on the day price would discourage people making a last minute decision to attend. A difficult one to get absolutely right in everyone's opinion.

Crowd attendances look good compared to previous seasons especially when you consider the poor performance so far in CC and RL50. However, it should be possible with improved marketing to get the numbers higher given the population within the catchment area.

I personally agree the comments regarding the start time - consistency is important and I used to hate trying to get down for the earlier start times due to the traffic.

Would food and drink prices (assuming the earlier "fact" concerning price of a pint is correct) be a deterrent for people to attend more than one game? Just a thought that if you feel ripped off do you say never again.
LE - aka John
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#3
(16-07-2017, 11:41 AM)Terry Wrote: I've followed and enjoyed the discussions about the T20 matches so far.
As the (cleaned up version of the) saying goes, opinions are like navels.  We all have them.  I may like mine more than I like yours; but that's my privilege.
It does seem to me that some of the opinions about the T20 Blast at Edgbaston are soundly based on the truth whereas others are based on facts that are a little bit shaky.
I try to keep up with these things so, sticking strictly to the facts as I believe them to be, I thought it might be worth pointing out the following:

Ticket prices
T20 ticket prices are exactly the same as last year - £15 in the early bird window, £19 until midnight on the preceding day and £23 on the day.  Under-16s are free at all times.  The prices went up by £1 at the start of 2016. Because the competition didn't start until July, the early bird window actually lasted twice as long this year.

Crowd attendances
Two T20 group games at Edgbaston in 2016 had attendances of more than 9,000 (Worcestershire Rapids and Notts Outlaws).  So far this year, both of the two opening games have had attendances over 9,000.

Starting times
There were several reasons for the decision to start matches at 7.00pm
Firstly, there was quite a lot of feedback from spectators after last season that there is still too much traffic around Birmingham city centre and Edgbaston at 6.30pm which was the start time last year.
Secondly, two of the evening games are being shown on Sky straight after play completes in a Test match, which makes a 7pm start essential.
With all evening games this year falling on a Friday or Saturday, it was believed by the club that starting the Sky games at one time and the others at a different time would have been confusing.

Of course, based on the above, it's possible to have all sorts of opinions - that the ticket prices are too high/too low, that crowd attendances are great/disgracefully low/could or could not be improved, that starting times are better/worse than last year, etc. 
But even in this era of alternative facts, it may be worth starting with us all agreeing on a few truths before we diverge into the range of opinions that keep this board alive.

What constitutes an early bird deal?
I have been looking as a few of us are going next Sunday but can only find tickets for £19.
How do you get them for £15?

Thanks in advance for any answers.
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#4
The early bird period ended a few weeks ago. Tickets are £19 and £23 on the day.

To be honest £23 on the day does put people off..... a season pass for all games was also good value.
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#5
Thanks, thought I was missing something.
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#6
Yes, early bird applies from February when the tickets go on sale until early May.

As for the ‘no cans, alcohol or glass bottles’ policy, it has been in place for several years for T20 and internationals.  The thinking is that a full can/bottle is something that could cause damage when thrown.  I guess a similar policy is in force at many other sporting venues and events, though I don't have the facts to back that up - maybe others can comment. 

I did notice that Lord's is an exception to this for some reason - their website says:
"Lord's is the only international cricket venue in the world where spectators can bring alcohol into the ground.

A spectator may bring alcoholic drinks into the Ground in one of the following descriptions and quantities:
(I) under 6% ABV – 2 pints (1136 ml); or (II) between 6% and 18% ABV – 75cl.
Amounts of alcohol in excess of these limits and any alcohol in excess of 18% ABV will be confiscated.
Spectators will not be re-admitted to Lord’s Ground at any time during the day if in possession of any alcohol.
Amounts in excess of this will be confiscated. MCC reserves the right to confiscate any quantity of alcohol from any spectator."

Mind you, you would have paid from £85 to watch the recent Lord's Test whereas the day/night Test at Edgbaston is priced from £26.  The T20 prices at Lord's are slightly more expensive than Edgbaston - £25 reduced to £20, compared with £23 and £19.
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#7
Lord's gets special dispensation from ICC. I think they said it was cultural for members and spectators to bring bottles to the ground.

As for the crowds at Edgbaston I really don't see how it can be clever to alienate Coventry, Nuneaton, Rugby, Stratford, Warwick, Kenilworth, Atherstone etc.

At some stage they will have to re-think the name change. It seems to be based on the Pavillion loan and attracting city based sponsorship.
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#8
(03-08-2017, 05:21 AM)Jon Wrote: Lord's gets special dispensation from ICC. I think they said it was cultural for members and spectators to bring bottles to the ground.

As for the crowds at Edgbaston I really don't see how it can be clever to alienate Coventry, Nuneaton, Rugby, Stratford, Warwick, Kenilworth, Atherstone etc.

At some stage they will have to re-think the name change. It seems to be based on the Pavillion loan and attracting city based sponsorship.

They'll almost certainly have to re-think it by 2020, when the new city T20 competition comes in, as I think it's fairly safe to assume one of the franchises will be Birmingham (unless it's West Midlands, or something similar).
Proud to be a Bear
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#9
It will be fascinating to see what decisions are made about team names for the new T20 competition. 
I think city names are likely to be divisive - no-one from Bradford or Sheffield is likely to support a team named Leeds.  County names are probably out - I think Sussex had an assurance from the ECB that county names wouldn't be used.  Regional names aren't very exciting - the Midlands Maulers v the South West Sluggers doesn't make the heart beat faster.  Maybe we will have names that are not location specific, like the Tigers or the Bulls but most people probably want some geographic link in the team name.
So who knows? I think it's a real problem for the ECB.
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Leicester Exile
#10
Agreed Terry.

And also shows why Warwickshire's decision to play as Birmingham was short sighted as well as being bizarre give WCCC was formed and exists to represent the geographic county of Warwickshire and I can't think of any Club in any sport which calls itself a different name when playing.
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Leicester Exile
#11
(03-08-2017, 11:53 AM)Terry Wrote: It will be fascinating to see what decisions are made about team names for the new T20 competition. 
I think city names are likely to be divisive - no-one from Bradford or Sheffield is likely to support a team named Leeds.  County names are probably out - I think Sussex had an assurance from the ECB that county names wouldn't be used.  Regional names aren't very exciting - the Midlands Maulers v the South West Sluggers doesn't make the heart beat faster.  Maybe we will have names that are not location specific, like the Tigers or the Bulls but most people probably want some geographic link in the team name.
So who knows? I think it's a real problem for the ECB.

Yes a problem of the ECB's own doing - announcing things before thinking the whole thing through. Very amateurish.
LE - aka John
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Jon
#12
(03-08-2017, 05:21 AM)Jon Wrote: Lord's gets special dispensation from ICC. I think they said it was cultural for members and spectators to bring bottles to the ground.

As for the crowds at Edgbaston I really don't see how it can be clever to alienate Coventry, Nuneaton, Rugby, Stratford, Warwick, Kenilworth, Atherstone etc.

At some stage they will have to re-think the name change. It seems to be based on the Pavillion loan and attracting city based sponsorship.


Not quite right Jon.

In fact the ICC said - around the turn of the century - that individual boards and stadiums were entirely at liberty to continue allowing the importation of alcohol into their grounds provided they would indemnify themselves against any injury caused to players or officials as a result of alcohol-induced bad behaviour.

I remember the MCC Chief Exec at the time being interviewed and him stating that Lords had taken out a fairly inexpensive insurance policy to cover this unlikely eventuality.

Which is why they impose a minor restriction of 1 bottle of wine and 4 cans with nothing else allowed in if you go out of the ground.

In actual fact, the blanket ban policy imposed by all of the other test venues has far more to do with exploiting a captive audience by selling them their own over-priced alcohol than it has to do with safety. 

Given that  - to my knowledge - there has never been any problem at international matches in this country save for the antics of entirely sober Pakistan supporters around 2000 - it would have been pretty inexpensive for Edgbaston and all the other test venues  to adopt the same policy as Lords. The fact that they didn't and still won't tells me all I need to know.

Of course all of this was so long ago that a new generation of fans now has no idea how this "ban" originated so it's easy to maintain the pretence that "it's all down to the ICC and there's nothing we can do about it".
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#13
The only trouble I can remember was 1987 when both sets of 'Fans' were to blame and there were people trying to get over the fence into the ground from the river during the England v Pakistan O.D.I. Pity it got such bad publicity at the time as it was a good game with England winning by 1 wicket. It was packed out by about 9.30, I couldn't get in like so many others but as I went home, a few thought they would take matters into their own hands. 'The Sun' (Other **** rags are available) had a field day over it the next day but it soon blew over.
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#14
DaveC that sounds so believable. I always thought it was an ICC world wide ban. I think that is how it was presented or maybe inferred that was the reason. Pretty well every "large attendance" event has the same importation ban. And whil people are daft enough to pay the inflated prices so the ban will continue.

I've even heard of pop concerts refusing people to take plastic bottles of water in. We, the general public, are daft
LE - aka John
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#15
(11-08-2017, 07:29 PM)Leicester Exile Wrote: DaveC that sounds so believable.

LE - I hate to equate the ICC with Josef Goebbels Cry  but it was he who once said:

"If you repeat a lie often enough, it becomes the truth. If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it."


As I said. Unlikely now that anyone under 35 has ever known anything other than the current situation so the venues and the ICC can effectively peddle the party line and get away with it.

paulbear - I was at that same game in 1987. A lot of the trouble was actually between late period National Front/BNP supporters and members of an Asian gang from Derby who were known as the Derby Lunatic Fringe (DLF). It was that experience that finally convinced us to give up sitting in the old Rea Bank stand and stump up for membership in order to avoid similar trouble in the future.
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#16
That's interesting information, Dave, though I thought that Derbyshire's Danish paceman Ole Mortensen, nicknamed Eric Bloodaxe, was a one-man Derby Lunatic Fringe.
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