Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
The Future of County Cricket
That scenario happens in sport frequently,take the final 2 men's ashes tests, doesn't mean the format should be changed
Reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes narsty simon's post:
Leicester Exile
(18-01-2018, 06:57 PM)narsty simon Wrote: That scenario happens in sport frequently,take the final 2 men's ashes tests, doesn't mean the format should be changed

That's fine in a sport or format where there is always plenty of interest anyway, but the fact of the matter is that the County Championship isn't as popular as it should be. Yes that's partly down to scheduling but also a large part of it is that most people aren't that enthused about watching a dead rubber between Leicestershire and Derbyshire. Give more of the matches more meaning and people will take more interest.
Proud to be a Bear
Reply
Can't say I agree EB. In football the EPL is only contested between half a dozen sides with another half dozen concerned about relegation. And those 12 teams could be selected before the season kicks off. And I don't think it is much different in the other tiers.
CC needs to be played throughout the summer on set days of the week. At present no one knows when the next game is unless you are a member with a fixture list. T20 has picked up more support since it had a general format as to when games are played e.g. Warks going for,in the main, Friday evenings.
LE - aka John
Reply
(18-01-2018, 11:42 PM)Leicester Exile Wrote: Can't say I agree EB. In football the EPL is only contested between half a dozen sides with another half dozen concerned about relegation. And those 12 teams could be selected before the season kicks off. And I don't think it is much different in the other tiers.
CC needs to be played throughout the summer on set days of the week. At present no one knows when the next game is unless you are a member with a fixture list. T20 has picked up more support since it had a general format as to when games are played e.g. Warks going for,in the main, Friday evenings.

What I meant is that even those teams that effectively have nothing to play for but to avoid relegation still get big crowds (in general) because football is a more accessible sport than cricket, and people are generally more interested in it. County cricket doesn't have that level of interest, so in my opinion needs to try something a bit different to try and generate it, one of which may be giving more matches more significance (and another is scheduling more matches at the weekend).
Proud to be a Bear
Reply
I think it's an OK idea, but would prefer to keep it as it is. Would be nice to see which other counties like the idea, and where we stand on this idea. Maybe our journalist friend Terry could do some digging on this subject.
Reply
I'm not sure that I have any new information but my thoughts are:
Whilst these proposals originated in Yorkshire, it looks as if there may be half a dozen of the smaller counties who are sympathetic to them. In particular, Rob Andrew, the CEO of Sussex, seems keen.
Some big counties may also see attractions in the proposals. Under the current set-up, if a county is weakened by providing several players to the England side, that increases the risk of relegation because a quarter of top division counties suffer the drop each year.
However, the timing of the proposals may not be great, coming after the Ashes defeat. Opponents of the planned conference system will say that the higher standard of play in the top division is a better preparation for Test Match cricket than going back to a mixing of the 18 counties, which would lead to more one-sided matches.
The idea that counties such as Leicestershire would magically up their red ball game under the conference system seems somewhat optimistic. It is true, however, that such lesser counties would have more of an incentive to develop young players. With no top division, the attraction for a player of switching counties would be much reduced.
Another negative that has not been much discussed is that the proposals are quite complicated - three conferences that later result in three divisions, with points carried forward. At a time when there is a major push to popularise the game, inventing a format that isn't instantly understandable may not look like a great idea. Such formats work in the US in, for example, baseball and basketball. But they are concepts that have been long established so that the public has grown up with them.
Will the Yorkshire plan be adopted?
My guess is probably not. As we know, the trend has been to reduce the amount of red ball cricket. The ECB will be aware that Director of England Cricket Andrew Strauss would like the Championship reduced to ten matches per team, not increased to 15.
Time will tell; but those looking for one extra four-day game per season shouldn’t hold their breath!
Keep up-to-date with County Cricket at http://deepextracover.com/
Reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes Terry's post:
Warleybear
I'd missed the point that the end of season play-offs would involve all the teams not just the best few. It seems to me that there is quite a lot that could go wrong with that ranging from weather interruption to unbalanced conferences giving some teams a big points advantage. Sounds far too complicated.

I will offer the ECB the closest thing that exists to a magic bullet to fix the ills of the CC: play it in the summer.
Reply
Excellent idea GB although far too radical for the ecb
Reply
Over the last few seasons, there have been far too many weekends where cricket of any format at county level hasnt been played in the country and certainly with a hundred miles of Birmingham. I also believe that some teams have become complacent in the four day game and the structure of the championship lends itself to that. Most sports prune themselves occasionally (either through natural selection... relegation out of the league ... or a franchise systems) and creates new growth... but Cricket doesnt.
Reply
Sir Geoffrey isn't everyone's favourite person but he often talks a lot of sense:
http://www.thecricketer.com/default.aspx...icid=43984
He doesn't pull his punches - "who is that player who bats for us (Yorkshire), bats like a crab? Peter Handscomb"
Keep up-to-date with County Cricket at http://deepextracover.com/
Reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes Terry's post:
Warleybear
About the only thing I would disagree with in that article is the suggestion that the CC could die in 20 years. I'd only give it 8.
Reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes GrizzlyBear's post:
Warleybear
Its been said for some time GB... but hasnt.... I remember it being said at the turn of the century that we would loose 2 counties in a decade... it didnt happen.

Saying that, I honestly believe that the current model isnt fit for purpose. It needs a shake up.... I wouldnt have a county in it who had finished with the wooden spoon seventy percent of the time this century.... . Despite a 40 point headstart over Durham, they still finished last. I would have no more than a dozen first class sides playing across the whole season .... the first class game is too based on the 19th century and the public school system whilst large areas of the country are not really represented in any format anymore. T20 is the vehicle to be more inclusive.... perhaps Leicester would be happier with a T20 franchise than continuously being the word for four day failure.
Reply
What a spot-on article - County Cricket has to be played through the summer, test players have to play regularly for their county and the number of days given over to Test and Internationals has to be reduced. Otherwise I agree with GB - 2026 could see the end of CC
LE - aka John
Reply
Agreed, I think he is pretty much spot on there. Am I the only one who read that article in his accent..?
Proud to be a Bear
Reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes Exiled Bear's post:
Leicester Exile
Warley, it's true that there have always been Jeremiahs (me included) that have seen an inexorable decline in the appeal of CC cricket and predicted its end at some point. The difference now is that the Counties and the ECB seem to actively want to kill it because it gets in the way of the money making donkey slog. I fear they are doing a rather good job of it.
Reply
[-] The following 2 users Like GrizzlyBear's post:
Leicester Exile, narsty simon
Surely the ECB will realise at some point that the future of the England Test team depends on a healthy County Championship..? Or am I just being blindly optimistic?
Proud to be a Bear
Reply
(23-01-2018, 09:28 AM)GrizzlyBear Wrote: Warley, it's true that there have always been Jeremiahs (me included) that have seen an inexorable decline in the appeal of CC cricket and predicted its end at some point. The difference now is that the Counties and the ECB seem to actively want to kill it because it gets in the way of the money making donkey slog. I fear they are doing a rather good job of it.
Love the term'donkey slog', will write that down and use it
Reply
I can't claim originality for "donkey slog". I picked it up from a letter in The Cricketer magazine and thought it was too apt to let it go to waste.
Reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes GrizzlyBear's post:
narsty simon
This might be slightly off-topic because it's not just about county cricket; but here's an interesting spat between Peter Trego and Stan Collymore:
http://www.somersetcountygazette.co.uk/s...f_cricket/
Keep up-to-date with County Cricket at http://deepextracover.com/
Reply
(24-01-2018, 11:17 AM)Terry Wrote: This might be slightly off-topic because it's not just about county cricket; but here's an interesting spat between Peter Trego and Stan Collymore:
http://www.somersetcountygazette.co.uk/s...f_cricket/

That's hilarious - and a look at the other replies on his Twitter feed seem to suggest that he doesn't hold the majority view. Is he the new Piers Morgan?
Proud to be a Bear
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)