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The Future of County Cricket
"and the point about the casual fan is that they are casual! That was why block T20 didn't work very well last time."" Absolutely spot on.

The weather is another reason for spreading T20. If we have a wet July or wet August the new format will be a financial disaster.
LE - aka John
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In this article on Deep Extra Cover, I have tried to summarise what the counties have said (very little so far) and, by contrast, what some fans are saying. Then I have set out my own views in the Good, Bad and Ugly section:
http://deepextracover.com/2016/03/the-re...t-in-2017/
Keep up-to-date with County Cricket at http://deepextracover.com/
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Unfortunately my companies firewall has blocked that site.... but I'll look later Terry.

My very quick thoughts....

1. Some counties in division 2 will have been stuck there for a decade. Will they give up now and concentrate on the shorter forms only? A self fulfilling prophecy for the first class game?
2. 50 over cricket has been given the grave yard shift - 300 plus in April anyone?
3. T20 in a block - as has happened before; a lot of expense for pay as you go supporters and bad weather would really hit a major revenue stream for some clubs.

This is a staging post for franchised cricket based on the cities plus one or two others (perhaps like a Somerset)..... cricket is about to change forever.
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(10-03-2016, 12:19 AM)Mad Brummie Wrote: Brilliant post on the Guardian website in response to Mike Selvey's article

Thought it worth re-posting here.

Thoughts?

Mike Selvey has seen the light on the road to Melbourne!

I read this with a sense of disappoint I always seem to have when I read major cricket writers I respect on non-playing issues where they seem to singularly fail to understand large swathes of the cricket loving public. It's like the disappointment I felt when I read Selvey's article about recreational cricket that called for the re-instigation of artificial pitches in club cricket. It completely misunderstood the motivations, passions and interests of those that play serious (and less serious) club cricket up and down the country and was in need of a history lesson in the disastrous failure of that exact strategy from 30+ years ago. That article failed to understand and respect the people who play the game every weekend up and down the country - this fails to understand those who turn up to watch.

The basic point that Canute can't hold back the tide of T20 is fair as is the idea that County Cricket is niche. I like the idea of T20 v Championship/Test Matches and the decline of the 50 Overs game seems inevitable. The idea of moving the Championship start date later is also good. That makes sense to me. What I don't accept is the idea that city based franchises is the way to go for English cricket or that it represents a positive development because I think it massively misunderstand the English cricket audience which is not the same as the Australian cricket audience. There is a much bigger well of general cricket fans in Australia - the game just has a larger profile. In England we have a big divide between the hardcore fan and the casual fan - and the point about the casual fan is that they are casual! That was why block T20 didn't work very well last time.

People might be prepared to go once a month but expecting large numbers of people and families with only a passing interest in the game to turn-up 2/3 times a week was never going to work. The other point that always seems to get lost is the bloody weather - my general experience of watching T20 in England even in high summer is that it generally gets damn cold from about 8.00 onwards if you're not moving about and I normally spend the last 5-10 overs just hoping it ends quickly. That's not the case in Aus. Is it really an attractive prospect for a family to sit there shivering with bored kids sitting on their IPods while generic tunes get blared at them? I just can't see the conversation 'darling, the Bristol Buccaneers are playing the Nottingham Raiders at Nevil Road this evening it's only just started spitting so we might get away with it, Raiders have just signed Aaron Finch do you fancy taking the kids along?'

Only the English cricket establishment would look at the fact that we have 18 permanent professional bases for cricket across the country with strong links into clubs, schools and communities driven by long standing emotional attachments and treat that as if it was a massive roadblock to progress. Instead it would want to replace it with a set of bland marketing slogans, cheerleaders, golden helmets, mussaq and all the nonsense that goes into replacing real atmosphere with marketised 'entertainment'. T20 could do with improving but the idea of a city-based franchise system just leaves me utterly cold. The best atmospheres for evening T20 in this country are undoubtedly at Taunton, Worcester and Chelmsford do we really want to get rid of all that to chase the impossible dream of 50,000+ watching 2 teams of Harlem Globetrotters like global mercenaries at a cricket circus?

By the way, Championship might well be niche but the ECB and counties haven't half waved the white flag on it. I think there is an audience for Championship cricket - loads of people follow it online and listen to it on the radio now. Sky refuses to give it any TV coverage - I honestly think if it had a terrestrial TV deal with someone like ITV4 it would get surprisingly good viewing figures but Sky has completely buried it. Niche it may be - but no effort whatsoever has been put into exploiting that niche. Instead, English cricket has done the usual thing - discounting the interests of the real hardcore cricket fans in order to pursue a mass market in casual fans that does not actually exist. It's infuriating - no sport in any country has less of a grasp on its audience and what it wants than English Cricket does.

Brilliant post which sums up my views more eloquently than I could myself. But 2 more pennorth from me.

Still no mention of whether any cricket will be reinstated to Saturdays. We recall, do we not?, that the decision to vacate Saturdays was taken on the basis of a few hundred club players stating in ECB questionnaires that they could not attend on that day due to playing commitments. Because of this thousands of working county members are now left twiddling their thumbs for 50% of the time they have available to watch their teams.

Second, no acceptance of the sheer ball-ache of trying to rush down to your local county ground for a 6pm start on a weekday evening (Friday's being the worst). If the weather is even slightly variable most casual punters tend to opt for the armchair, rather than battling rush hour traffic. Once a week can be bad enough. Forcing that into 2 or maybe 3 visits a week and we'll be back to where we were pre-2014 in terms of dwindling audineces. But, as Terry points out in his DEC, piece maybe that's the diabolical ECB plan.
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Neil Snowball does say that the re-positioning of the Royal London competition should lead to more weekend cricket.
Keep up-to-date with County Cricket at http://deepextracover.com/
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Terry the final sentence in your article sums up exactly how the ECB operates.

Putting the T20 in to 2 blocks during school holidays has a further problem in addition to "testing punters' pockets" and being scuppered by a "couple of weeks of bad Weather" and that is - when does mom and dad take their offspring on their fortnight's holiday?

If the bookies decide to take bets on attendances declining in 2017 I will be first in the queue with a tenner.
LE - aka John
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[-] The following 2 users Like Leicester Exile's post:
narsty simon, Warleybear
(10-03-2016, 09:34 AM)Terry Wrote: In this article on Deep Extra Cover, I have tried to summarise what the counties have said (very little so far) and, by contrast, what some fans are saying. Then I have set out my own views in the Good, Bad and Ugly section:
http://deepextracover.com/2016/03/the-re...t-in-2017/

Very balanced well written piece as usual. With Brian Halford on the Warwickshire payroll he will hardly be free to criticise anything.
So your articles are very welcome.
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(10-03-2016, 11:27 PM)parkfield bear Wrote:
(10-03-2016, 09:34 AM)Terry Wrote: In this article on Deep Extra Cover, I have tried to summarise what the counties have said (very little so far) and, by contrast, what some fans are saying. Then I have set out my own views in the Good, Bad and Ugly section:
http://deepextracover.com/2016/03/the-re...t-in-2017/

Very balanced well written piece as usual. With Brian Halford on the Warwickshire payroll he will hardly be free to criticise anything.
So your articles are very welcome.

parkfield bear - thanks for your comments.  Honest man that he is, I'm sure that Brian Halford will say what he thinks about on-field performances.  But you're right that, in other ways, he probably won't be free to criticise his employers.
Keep up-to-date with County Cricket at http://deepextracover.com/
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A somewhat weaselly response to the changes from Gloucestershire:
http://www.gloscricket.co.uk/gccc-statem...e-changes/
What astonished me was this about the Cheltenham Festival: "at their request, we have provided the ECB with a full history of the festival and have highlighted its cricketing, cultural and financial importance."  I would have thought that anyone with the slightest interest in county cricket would know enough about the renowned Cheltenham Festival not to need to have it explained to them.  But maybe therein lies the problem - I was assuming that the key people at the ECB would have an interest in county cricket and understand its culture and history.
Keep up-to-date with County Cricket at http://deepextracover.com/
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The ECB are more out of touch with county cricket than 1 or2 of you on here
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(12-03-2016, 09:20 AM)Terry Wrote: I was assuming that the key people at the ECB would have an interest in county cricket and understand its culture and history.

Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha! ROFLMAO
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Actually the key decscion makers in many organisations have no interest in those type of things.... they tend to bring in the swing the axe type bstards, who do their dirty 'job' and move on.... take the flack and go. Whether its a mildly chummy incompetent look.... or sharp suits.... there are many people and organisations that have had dealings with these types.... the axe and move on brigade. Dirty job... but there are always people around to do it whilst keeping a lid on things..... why would the Cheltenham festival be of any interest to a grim reaper?
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First time poster. 

Why have Warwickshire not considered playing two T20 games in one day? On a Saturday or Sunday 1.30 & 5.30 pm. No problem for the players. It would be an advantage for Warwickshire. They can change the team to suit the wicket in the second game. 

Market it as a super Saturday or Sunday.
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1) it would reduce the number of home games, & hence income
2) it would disadvantage Warwickshire in the second game, as the opposition would be less tired.
3) if the weather was bad, the is the risk of losing two games to the conditions & facing a significant financial loss
4) would the average T20 fan want to spent c8 hours at the ground?

Two games in a day only works if both games are between the same teams, as in the 2nd xi T20 competition, but that competition is primarily for the development of players.
While Robert may be bad, Robert is not all Mugabe's.
There are GOOD Mugabe's
It is Warwickshire County Cricket Club!
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Re point4,T20 fans spend longer than that in the ground on finals day,I think2 games a day's a great idea,frees up more time for proper cricket& could've prevented a reduction in championship fixtures
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Good point Simon, but the finals day is a special case, with supporters from all four participating clubs, and also a significant number who are there for the "event" regardless of the teams involved.

Major League Baseball has for many many years had two games in one day on occasions, & while it may produce a higher attendance, and incidental spend, than a normal single game, it does not provide double the net income, so they are only played now to make up games lost to the weather, or there are fixed travel arrangements for both of the participating sides.

A 16 game championship could have been retained if the schedule was planned differently, but the ecb believe that the public only want 20 over cricket.
While Robert may be bad, Robert is not all Mugabe's.
There are GOOD Mugabe's
It is Warwickshire County Cricket Club!
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The public do,cricket fans don't!
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[-] The following 1 user Likes narsty simon's post:
The Good Mugabe
Another good point!

If marketed properly, indeed if marketed, the county championship could become a significant revenue stream for the counties, especially with higher yielding "added content" tickets, giving better conditions, say lounge access, &/or inclusive catering.
That principle has being proven to work for many years by the festival weeks at Cheltenham, Arundel, Scarborough &, even, Colwyn Bay!

We now have three, main, forms of our game, surely it's the role of the governing bodies to promote, protect & grow ALL three forms of the game.
While Robert may be bad, Robert is not all Mugabe's.
There are GOOD Mugabe's
It is Warwickshire County Cricket Club!
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Sadly the ECB don't share your views of proper cricket,all they cae about are the t20 slog& thanks to Strauss,the50 over game,listening to Elworthy last Wednesday made me disillusioned& saddened as to the direction the game's heading
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This article shows up the mis-match between what the players want and what the fans want:
http://www.espncricinfo.com/county-crick...82645.html
Keep up-to-date with County Cricket at http://deepextracover.com/
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