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Return of free-to-air cricket coverage?
#21
Don't you mean DAILY Star, Terry? A must read for those who want to know where Elvis lives!!

As Australian games take place in the middle of the night I am not sure BT have spent wisely. However, having two pay channels for sport just increases the cost for the viewer.
LE - aka John
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#22
No, it's the Morning Star:
http://www.morningstaronline.co.uk/
I already know that Elvis works at a chippie close to Edgbaston.
Keep up-to-date with County Cricket at http://deepextracover.com/
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#23
Report here:
http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2015/au...ia-cricket
It would appear that there will be some "free to air" cricket as part of the deal:
"BT’s deal with Cricket Australia also includes the free-to-air rights to international highlights and the Big Bash, as well as one “match of the week” in the domestic T20 league that will be shown on BT’s free-to-air channel."
It doesn't actually say if the T20 "match of the week" will be shown live.
Keep up-to-date with County Cricket at http://deepextracover.com/
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#24
I wrongly thought that the T20 match of the week was from our T20 competition but according to BT's own site, it is the Big Bash - but it will be shown live on their free-to-air channel:

"BT Sport has also acquired a free-to-air rights package that includes daily highlights of international matches and the Big Bash League, as well as one Big Bash League ‘match of the round’ broadcast live and free each week."
Keep up-to-date with County Cricket at http://deepextracover.com/
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#25
Are BT becoming a big threat to the sky monopoly. I notice that unless you get your bb through BT you can't subscribe to their online sports package. You have to get it though sky or get bt broadband. That is annoying as i am committed to a one year fibre optic package with aquiss.

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#26
Who benefits from this competition between pay to view broadcasters? Certainly not the punter.
LE - aka John
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#27
Not at all because sky won't reduce their prices and you will have to pay for BT sport as well.

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#28
BT line rental increasses each year for us all to 'backdoor' subsidise this football based sports crap. There is no real competition as that rate is tracked by many 'copper' competitors.... BT openreach is all part of that pseudo competition farce.

Anyway... I must look out for Elvis in that Edgbaston chip shop.... sad that H&S rules means he cant use the morning star to wrap them in ;-)
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#29
I think BT just lost a few prospective viewers:
http://www.givemesport.com/620996-bt-spo...utoplay=on
Keep up-to-date with County Cricket at http://deepextracover.com/
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#30
or gained some lol

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#31
With sport increasingly being split between Sky and BT with crown jewels staying on free-to-view I can forsee many just giving up on pay tv for sport. Biggest problem is individual sports being split. Rugby football and now cricket shown on Sky and BT.
LE - aka John
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#32
Whats the crown jewels? Wimbledon, Grand National, Five Nations. What else is there on free for view live. Football is and will always be the most popular sport to watch so I think people will pay the topup to get BT. The only sports i watch are cricket, football and tennis.

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#33
(25-08-2015, 10:44 PM)Paul Wrote: Whats the crown jewels? Wimbledon, Grand National, Five Nations. What else is there on free for view live. Football is and will always be the most popular sport to watch so I think people will pay the topup to get BT. The only sports i watch are cricket, football and tennis.

Snooker and some golf but not much else. Here's the full list of events that have to be shown on terrestrial TV:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ofcom_Code...ted_Events
Proud to be a Bear
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#34
Free-to-air cricket seems even further away with the announcement that the BBC is cutting £35 million from its sports rights budget.
Keep up-to-date with County Cricket at http://deepextracover.com/
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#35
Don't lose all hope -ITV seem to be getting more involved in sport of late - who knows
LE - aka John
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#36
I don't watch the BBC anymore.... Pedalling left wing do gooder propaganda all summer and then watching the horrors of their social experiment played out on the streets of Paris last Friday. The BBC lost all journalistic credibility this year. In these days of Internet TV such as Now TV, Amazon, Netflix, Demand 4 etc. they are becoming an irrelevance.... Television is rapidly changing..... Domestic cricket will reappear in a new way on a new platform. Scrap the TV license, and with the money I could choose to watch a lot of sport when I choose to via one of the mainstream legal internet platforms.
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#37
I'm a sky subscriber but cricket does seem to be the only sport which sold its soul to satellite tv

Football, golf, tennis, rugby all benefit from a presence on terrestrial.

Cricket has become a sideshow on sports personality of the year and the decline in domestic attendances can be traced back to 2005 when cricket was removed from C4. remember that year our final against Hampshire was sold out.

The way things are going cricket will become a niche sport to middle and upper class supporters and Asian communities. this appears to be Warwickshire's marketing strategy. Cricket should work very hard not to lose mainstream appeal.
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#38
(20-11-2015, 12:49 PM)Jon Wrote: I'm a sky subscriber but cricket does seem to be the only sport which sold its soul to satellite tv

Football, golf, tennis, rugby all benefit from a presence on terrestrial.

Cricket has become a sideshow on sports personality of the year and the decline in domestic attendances can be traced back to 2005 when cricket was removed from C4. remember that year our final against Hampshire was sold out.

The way things are going cricket will become a niche sport to middle and upper class supporters and Asian communities. this appears to be Warwickshire's marketing strategy. Cricket should work very hard not to lose mainstream appeal.

The problem with having cricket on terrestial cricket is:
  • ECB have recently signed an agreement to transmit international cricket to south Asia - Massive revenue potential
  • BT Sports now a major (growing) competitor to Sky (Selected coverage only at this time)
  • Computer/Video based Computer Companies now in the mix - Signing Internet deals to transmit international cricket via laptop, tablets et al - Massive sums of money being invested - Big returns expected.
  • Terrestial TV Companies do not have the money to compete at this time - Take BBC they've even lost the Ryder Cup Golf to Sky.
There was talk I believe when Gordon Brown was Prime Minister that it be enshrined in to law that certain sporting events (including  at least 1 Home Test Match) be shown on terrestial TV but nothing came of that did it? What's the answer - I haven't got a clue BUT you are absolutley right Cricket needs to work very hard not to lose mainstream appeal.

Don't agree that it will become a niche sport though (No such thing as upper class in my world - never believed in any form of breakdown of people by 'class') - With regard to Asian Communities from personal experience Asian Cricket is very strong particularly in Birmingham BUT British Asians don't go to watch much cricket not unless India or Pakistan are in town - They don't attend 4-Day cricket in great numbers do they?

Cricket Organisations and Clubs are very active in Warwickshire in getting people from all backgrounds involved/interested in cricket (playing, watching, organising) - More work needs to be done - YES it would help if some cricket (not just highlights/soundbites) were shown on terrestial TV.
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#39
(20-11-2015, 02:11 PM)DJL Wrote:
(20-11-2015, 12:49 PM)Jon Wrote: I'm a sky subscriber but cricket does seem to be the only sport which sold its soul to satellite tv

Football, golf, tennis, rugby all benefit from a presence on terrestrial.

Cricket has become a sideshow on sports personality of the year and the decline in domestic attendances can be traced back to 2005 when cricket was removed from C4. remember that year our final against Hampshire was sold out.

The way things are going cricket will become a niche sport to middle and upper class supporters and Asian communities. this appears to be Warwickshire's marketing strategy. Cricket should work very hard not to lose mainstream appeal.

The problem with having cricket on terrestial cricket is:
  • ECB have recently signed an agreement to transmit international cricket to south Asia - Massive revenue potential
  • BT Sports now a major (growing) competitor to Sky (Selected coverage only at this time)
  • Computer/Video based Computer Companies now in the mix - Signing Internet deals to transmit international cricket via laptop, tablets et al - Massive sums of money being invested - Big returns expected.
  • Terrestial TV Companies do not have the money to compete at this time - Take BBC they've even lost the Ryder Cup Golf to Sky.
There was talk I believe when Gordon Brown was Prime Minister that it be enshrined in to law that certain sporting events (including  at least 1 Home Test Match) be shown on terrestial TV but nothing came of that did it? What's the answer - I haven't got a clue BUT you are absolutley right Cricket needs to work very hard not to lose mainstream appeal.

Don't agree that it will become a niche sport though (No such thing as upper class in my world - never believed in any form of breakdown of people by 'class') - With regard to Asian Communities from personal experience Asian Cricket is very strong particularly in Birmingham BUT British Asians don't go to watch much cricket not unless India or Pakistan are in town - They don't attend 4-Day cricket in great numbers do they?

Cricket Organisations and Clubs are very active in Warwickshire in getting people from all backgrounds involved/interested in cricket (playing, watching, organising) - More work needs to be done - YES it would help if some cricket (not just highlights/soundbites) were shown on terrestial TV.


Whatever one's views class is a reality for anybody who works in marketing and pr in terms of identifying markets and audiences.

When I was growing up lads at state schools played at school and for local cricket clubs. The Coventry League was a works league. Cricket was one of the nation's favourite games and played by people from all backgrounds and schools. Gradually cricket is becoming a much more exclusive and expensive experience. Look at sponsors for clues to audiences. Waitrose and Investec. 

As for tv rights even the richest organisations in the world like the Premier League know they have to keep a prominent presence on terrestrial tv and price products accordingly. At one stage rugby union went down the road of exclusivity for satellite but quickly learnt how detrimental that was and returned 6 nations to BBC. 

There is far too much short termism in cricket whether it be the ECB or likes of Povey at WCCC.
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#40
(20-11-2015, 04:11 PM)Jon Wrote:
(20-11-2015, 02:11 PM)DJL Wrote:
(20-11-2015, 12:49 PM)Jon Wrote: I'm a sky subscriber but cricket does seem to be the only sport which sold its soul to satellite tv

Football, golf, tennis, rugby all benefit from a presence on terrestrial.

Cricket has become a sideshow on sports personality of the year and the decline in domestic attendances can be traced back to 2005 when cricket was removed from C4. remember that year our final against Hampshire was sold out.

The way things are going cricket will become a niche sport to middle and upper class supporters and Asian communities. this appears to be Warwickshire's marketing strategy. Cricket should work very hard not to lose mainstream appeal.

The problem with having cricket on terrestial cricket is:
  • ECB have recently signed an agreement to transmit international cricket to south Asia - Massive revenue potential
  • BT Sports now a major (growing) competitor to Sky (Selected coverage only at this time)
  • Computer/Video based Computer Companies now in the mix - Signing Internet deals to transmit international cricket via laptop, tablets et al - Massive sums of money being invested - Big returns expected.
  • Terrestial TV Companies do not have the money to compete at this time - Take BBC they've even lost the Ryder Cup Golf to Sky.
There was talk I believe when Gordon Brown was Prime Minister that it be enshrined in to law that certain sporting events (including  at least 1 Home Test Match) be shown on terrestial TV but nothing came of that did it? What's the answer - I haven't got a clue BUT you are absolutley right Cricket needs to work very hard not to lose mainstream appeal.

Don't agree that it will become a niche sport though (No such thing as upper class in my world - never believed in any form of breakdown of people by 'class') - With regard to Asian Communities from personal experience Asian Cricket is very strong particularly in Birmingham BUT British Asians don't go to watch much cricket not unless India or Pakistan are in town - They don't attend 4-Day cricket in great numbers do they?

Cricket Organisations and Clubs are very active in Warwickshire in getting people from all backgrounds involved/interested in cricket (playing, watching, organising) - More work needs to be done - YES it would help if some cricket (not just highlights/soundbites) were shown on terrestial TV.


Whatever one's views class is a reality for anybody who works in marketing and pr in terms of identifying markets and audiences.

When I was growing up lads at state schools played at school and for local cricket clubs. The Coventry League was a works league. Cricket was one of the nation's favourite games and played by people from all backgrounds and schools. Gradually cricket is becoming a much more exclusive and expensive experience. Look at sponsors for clues to audiences. Waitrose and Investec. 

As for tv rights even the richest organisations in the world like the Premier League know they have to keep a prominent presence on terrestrial tv and price products accordingly. At one stage rugby union went down the road of exclusivity for satellite but quickly learnt how detrimental that was and returned 6 nations to BBC. 

There is far too much short termism in cricket whether it be the ECB or likes of Povey at WCCC.

Don't work in Marketing or PR - Understand its value to a cause though - The only Class i relate to is in describing how good a Cricketer is/was - i.e. Tom Graveney a Class Batsman! - The Class System should have gone out with WW2 - It has no place in a modern society.

Birmingham Cricket obviously somewhat different to the set up in Coventry as it would appear to have a wide player base irrespective of background etc - Certainly agree that Cricket is becoming more expensive - That needs attention.

As regards TV Rights - No one is more supportive than me in hoping that full terrestial coverage (not just highlights) could be made available BUT that's not the way The Powers That Be see it at the moment - CASH IS KING as far as the National/International Cricket Organisations are concerned and they will contract with the highest bidder(s) UNLESS their is legislation in place to ensure otherwise - We are back to your PR and Marketing (Mad) Men again.

Totally agree with you that there is too much short termism in cricket - In conversation with a Warwickshire CCC Committee Member earlier this year I was reminded that they were running a business - As if I didn't know already?

Great Post - Keep up the good work - Well played.
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