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The weather thread
#81
yes there are always going to be a minority of sceptics. There are still those that believe the holocaust didn't happen.
Regarding LE'S suggestion about these experts having their own incentive I would doubt this very much.
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was setup by the united nations. Thousands of scientists all over the world have given their time freely to come up with this very intensive 6 year report. I doubt whether govts really want to hear this news because reducing our carbon emissions by 80% is going to be costly. You wont have to wait until 2050 to see the effects we are seeing them now.
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#82
Linking this debate with the holocaust is very unfortunate and somewhat offensive.
These experts are 95% certain and use phrases like "highly likely" that man is to blame. I'm not arguingn that climate change is not happening just that I am not convinced it's man to blame rather than the climate has never "stood still". Also why are the last 15 years of no change being ignored?
Anyway regardless of where the truth lies there is very little any of us on out tiny island can do to change things.
LE - aka John
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#83
Not being offensive I am just making the point when the truth is there for all to see people are still sceptical.

You have to look at the bigger picture than the last 15 years.

"The combined average land and ocean surface data show a temperature rise of 0.85C over the period 1880-2012, the authors go on to say.

In addition, it is "virtually certain" that the upper 700m of the Earth's oceans have warmed during the period from 1971 and 2010. The deep ocean, below 3,000m in depth, "likely" warmed between 1992 and 2005, says the report, with the largest effect observed in the Southern Ocean.

The report says that the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have been losing mass, glaciers have continued to shrink, and Arctic sea-ice as well as Northern Hemisphere spring snow cover have continued to fall in extent.

Sea level rise will proceed more quickly than it has done over the past 40 years. Waters are expected to rise, the document says, by between 26cm (at the low end) and 82cm (at the high end), depending on greenhouse emissions this century"

Yes if other countries don't do their bit to reduce carbon emissions then our effort will make little difference. But isn't that like saying "Whats the point of me not throwing litter on the ground if other people cant be bothered"


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#84
Not being offensive I am just making the point when the truth is there for all to see people are still sceptical.

You have to look at the bigger picture than the last 15 years.

"The combined average land and ocean surface data show a temperature rise of 0.85C over the period 1880-2012, the authors go on to say.

In addition, it is "virtually certain" that the upper 700m of the Earth's oceans have warmed during the period from 1971 and 2010. The deep ocean, below 3,000m in depth, "likely" warmed between 1992 and 2005, says the report, with the largest effect observed in the Southern Ocean.

The report says that the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have been losing mass, glaciers have continued to shrink, and Arctic sea-ice as well as Northern Hemisphere spring snow cover have continued to fall in extent.

Sea level rise will proceed more quickly than it has done over the past 40 years. Waters are expected to rise, the document says, by between 26cm (at the low end) and 82cm (at the high end), depending on greenhouse emissions this century"

Yes if other countries don't do their bit to reduce carbon emissions then our effort will make little difference. But isn't that like saying "Whats the point of me not throwing litter on the ground if other people cant be bothered"


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#85
I'll start by saying that any suggestions that the contributors to this report are somehow presenting the facts in an untruthful way is completely ludicrous. The meteorology department at Reading University, where I am currently studying, has had considerable involvement in the production of this report. I know from talking to and having lectures given by some of the contributors to this report that they are extremely passionate about their subject and, in some cases, have devoted their entire careers to researching climate change. What would they have to gain by making it all up?

Secondly, "our tiny island" is the 9th highest emitter of CO2 in the world, so I think that there is a great deal that we as a nation can do. Obviously, as Paul says, if other countries don't reduce their as well then it may not make too much of a difference, but we need to lead by example and show that it can be done. Even simple things like not using excessive amounts of electricity and not driving when you don't need to will make a difference if everyone chips in. The government also needs to do more to encourage the installation of solar panels on houses, and personally I think that most if not all new housing should be fitted with them. My parents recently had some installed and they now produce more electricity than they use, to the effect that their meter is actually going backwards as the excess is fed in to the national grid, and this is in the north of England! If even only 50% of houses in the UK had solar panels on then that would make a staggering difference and would reduce our reliance on coal power stations. Fossil fuels will run out at some point in the future, so surely it can only be a good thing to be ready when they do?

I'm not even going to go into why climate change is happening and why it is so blatantly obvious that it is for the reasons in Grizzly's post. What I will say though is that to continue to deny its existence will have catastrophic impacts on humanity, particularly those in poorer countries and I for one don't want to be in the position where we have to say to our children and grandchildren "We knew all about climate change and the devastating consequences it would have on our planet but chose to do absolutely nothing about it, sorry about that".
Proud to be a Bear
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Paul
#86
Excellently written Exiled Bear. Obviously I have nowhere near your level of knowledge on the subject but I do feel passionately about it and I care about the planet we leave to your generation and future generations. it shouldn't be all about here and now. We have already left your generation with crippling debts that you will have to pay off.
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#87
Excellently written Exiled Bear. Obviously I have nowhere near your level of knowledge on the subject but I do feel passionately about it and I care about the planet we leave to your generation and future generations. it shouldn't be all about here and now. We have already left your generation with crippling debts that you will have to pay off for years to come.
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#88
Thank you Paul. I'm usually not very good at writing down my thoughts so I'm glad it came across ok. I too am passionate about it (as you might have guessed) and it's reassuring to know that there are others who feel the same. I'm by no means an expert on the subject but then I don't think it takes an expert to realise that climate change is an incredibly important issue!
Proud to be a Bear
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#89
Yes i too was a sceptic like LE a few years Back but having researched it a little more I begun to realise just what an important issue it is., i apoligise about my reference to the holocaust but if we do nothing then there will be a lot more than 6 million people wiped off the fsce of the earth.,

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#90
No need to apologise Paul I can see it comes from a passionate belief on the issue. For me I just find it hard to accept that it's man's wrongdoing that is the sole cause of global warming when I think the earth's temp. has fluctuated throughout the millions of years of our existence. I am not saying we should do nothing - just that I do not see it as being anywhere as serious as they think it "might be".
I feel more passionate about the way we have invented plastic and then throw it away on land and sea to harm all the other creatures on the planet.
A flippant comment I know, but nature has a way of balancing the planet and maybe something that wipes out much more than 6 million humans is what is needed to stem the overcrowding of the land.
LE - aka John
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#91
(28-09-2013, 10:44 AM)Leicester Exile Wrote: I feel more passionate about the way we have invented plastic and then throw it away on land and sea to harm all the other creatures on the planet.

yes that is wrong

A flippant comment I know, but nature has a way of balancing the planet and maybe something that wipes out much more than 6 million humans is what is needed to stem the overcrowding of the land.

how about billions though LE. Increased floods, Tsunamis, fires, world food shortage because of climate change. It could happen

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#92
http://www.reading.ac.uk/news-and-events...36809.aspx
Proud to be a Bear
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#93
A truly incredible tropical cyclone is making landfall in Asia:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-24846813

Average wind speeds of 195mph and gusting to 236mph - truly gob-smacking. There's also very little coverage of it in the media when you consider just how powerful this storm is - if it was going to make landfall in the USA it would be all over the news for weeks.
Proud to be a Bear
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#94
I agree. You only have to compare the low profile given to it to the semi-hysteria generated a week or so ago when there was a storm across the south of England.
A friend of mine who travels regularly to the Philippines for work reasons was saying yesterday that, of necessity, most people there have a much more fatalistic attitude towards life and the disasters that can happen.
Keep up-to-date with County Cricket at http://deepextracover.com/
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#95
How dreadfull. Over a million people forced to leave their homes. If something like this happened in the Uk could you possibly imagine it.
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#96
I read an article recently that was making the point that the planet is 100s of millions of years old and we've only been building cities for a few hundred. Some of those cities are going to turn out to be in the wrong place, geologically and climatologically speaking. We already know about Tokyo, San Francisco and New Orleans. Some of the places we consider to be safe could turn out to be anything but, if only we really understood the planet.
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#97
(08-11-2013, 03:47 PM)GrizzlyBear Wrote: I read an article recently that was making the point that the planet is 100s of millions of years old and we've only been building cities for a few hundred. Some of those cities are going to turn out to be in the wrong place, geologically and climatologically speaking. We already know about Tokyo, San Francisco and New Orleans. Some of the places we consider to be safe could turn out to be anything but, if only we really understood the planet.

Most of the North American continent, and indeed the world, would be in extreme danger if the Yellowstone super-volcano were to erupt, and I think that it is possible for it to do so any day now.
Proud to be a Bear
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#98
(08-11-2013, 04:08 PM)Exiled Bear Wrote:
(08-11-2013, 03:47 PM)GrizzlyBear Wrote: I read an article recently that was making the point that the planet is 100s of millions of years old and we've only been building cities for a few hundred. Some of those cities are going to turn out to be in the wrong place, geologically and climatologically speaking. We already know about Tokyo, San Francisco and New Orleans. Some of the places we consider to be safe could turn out to be anything but, if only we really understood the planet.

Most of the North American continent, and indeed the world, would be in extreme danger if the Yellowstone super-volcano were to erupt, and I think that it is possible for it to do so any day now.

Before next season? I'd like to know before I renew my membership
Keep up-to-date with County Cricket at http://deepextracover.com/
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#99
(08-11-2013, 04:08 PM)Exiled Bear Wrote:
(08-11-2013, 03:47 PM)GrizzlyBear Wrote: I read an article recently that was making the point that the planet is 100s of millions of years old and we've only been building cities for a few hundred. Some of those cities are going to turn out to be in the wrong place, geologically and climatologically speaking. We already know about Tokyo, San Francisco and New Orleans. Some of the places we consider to be safe could turn out to be anything but, if only we really understood the planet.

Most of the North American continent, and indeed the world, would be in extreme danger if the Yellowstone super-volcano were to erupt, and I think that it is possible for it to do so any day now.

Nice to know, at least it didn't happen when I was over in Yellowstone park.
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(08-11-2013, 04:24 PM)Terry Wrote:
(08-11-2013, 04:08 PM)Exiled Bear Wrote:
(08-11-2013, 03:47 PM)GrizzlyBear Wrote: I read an article recently that was making the point that the planet is 100s of millions of years old and we've only been building cities for a few hundred. Some of those cities are going to turn out to be in the wrong place, geologically and climatologically speaking. We already know about Tokyo, San Francisco and New Orleans. Some of the places we consider to be safe could turn out to be anything but, if only we really understood the planet.

Most of the North American continent, and indeed the world, would be in extreme danger if the Yellowstone super-volcano were to erupt, and I think that it is possible for it to do so any day now.

Before next season? I'd like to know before I renew my membership

When I say "any day now" what I mean is that it could happen any time between now and 10,000 years time! :thumbup: There would also be warning signs before it happened which could be weeks or even years before an eruption took place so I don't think there's an immediate threat!
Proud to be a Bear
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