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Rise and Fall alongside a great
#1
Vinod Kambli's claims that he got a raw deal in Indian cricket due to his cast and colour.

He started brightly but his rise alongside Tendulkar was different.

Kambli was a true prodigy. He outscored Sachin Tendulkar in their world record partnership of 664 for their school Shardashram. Both buddies went at the ball harder and harder, and runs came at six an over. Consider the final score. In 120 overs, Shardashram scored 748 runs and lost only two wickets. By no means was amassing runs at this rate an unfamiliar feeling. Shardashram routinely put up large scores and shut out the opposition. And this bowling attack was going to worry nobody. Tendulkar and Kambli's relaxed demeanour resulted in a frantic pace that went on for more than a day.

Tendulkar ended the day on 192, and Kambli was ten runs behind. Ramakant Achrekar, their stern coach, explained to Tendulkar that the team should declare first thing in the morning. The next day, with Achrekar far from the ground, Tendulkar put on his pads and Kambli followed suit. They weren't done with St Xavier's yet. Everyone in the tent - which doubled up as a dressing-room - had heard the coach's words, but Tendulkar was a megastar. The players just kept quiet. Amol Muzumdar, all of 13 years old and padded up since the fall of the first wicket, wondered if he'd ever get to bat. He had spent a day warming up, going for net practice to remain focussed, returning to see the two still batting, repeating this several times. But the two took advantage of Achrekar's absence and kept on batting. Other matches stopped as players wandered over to watch the show.

At lunch, selectively acting on Achrekar's instructions from the previous day, Tendulkar rang him up from Khao Galli and informed him the score was seven hundred and something, and that Vinod was on 349. He wisely kept his own score to himself, and instead told Achrekar that Kambli wanted to reach his 350. Almost innocently, he passed the phone to the horrified Kambli. The innings was declared immediately. Tendulkar was on 326, and the stand was worth 664 runs. No one knew, at least for a while, that a new record had been written.


Kambli made his India debut three years after Tendulkar, who had lived up to the hype created around him by scoring a century on his Ranji debut, and some glittering batting from the early stages of his international career. But Kambli, when he got to play for India, started very well. In his first seven Tests, he made two double centuries and as many centuries.

Yet, he played the last of his 17 Tests in 1995, when he was just 23, despite a very healthy average of 54.20.

But perhaps those first seven Tests were his best. As happens so often with dazzling starters, Kambli found it difficult to keep the show going. He could kill the spinners — he once famously clouted 22 runs in one Shane Warne over — but more often than not got himself into a tangle when facing the rising short ball. In the later stages of his India career — he played a few ODIs after that last Test — he looked somewhat out of his league. There is also talk of issues over his conduct. According to a former BCCI loudmouth, Mohammad Azharuddin had in 1999 written a letter to the board complaining that Kambli misbehaved in the dressing room.

Kambli could not cope with fame- his love of "bling" was far better suited to a career in showbusiness than sport. And so, in 2002, he embarked on a second career as a Bollywood actor. His maiden role was in the gangster movie, Annarth, but the reviews were not kind. "Kambli danced with elan but ran as poorly on screen as on the playing field," said The Times of India. "Kambli may want to spend some money on acting lessons before appearing in a film again,"

Kambli has allegedly recently said "I always felt discriminated because of my cast and colour by the Cricket Board." The former India player spoke against the Board and Tendulkar. Tendulkar has been one to help players and Kambli claims are unusual. He denies them now.

It will always be the rise and fall of a non existent player alongside a true great whatever the reasons for it were.

Now sorry for wasting 5 mins of your time. But that is my 2000TH.
Supporter of 2012 County Relegation candidates

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#2
Your right he started like a train, then disappeared, although I thought he was a great fielder. This a great piece for you 2000th.
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#3
And an excellent one it was too - thoigh a 2000th acknowlegeing my lead in the ashes fantasy league would have been evern better. I remember Kambli but hadnt realised hed done so well in his first tests.A wasted talent.
Supporter of the 2014 County Champions
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#4
I remember him, India produce so many amazing batsmen
Chris, don't ask why Windy. No please don't. No.

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#5
I wish I could say I remembered him but dont, but great 2000th post DD.

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#6
Thanks, beats Kims 2000th about the juggler.


You dont remember a lot Paul.
Supporter of 2012 County Relegation candidates

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#7
Easy question - but it still amazes me. Who, unlike Vinod, had a terrible start to his test career. A batsmen, his first 7 test innings, over three and a half years, produced the follwing scores:
0
0
0
1
0
0

Yet he ended with over 5500 runs at nearly 40.

(Clue - its not Navdeep for Scotland either)_
Supporter of the 2014 County Champions
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#8
Well, Dennis Amiss had a poor start to his Test career but not that bad; and Graham Gooch got a pair at Edgbaston in his first Test courtesy of Lilian Thomson. But I think this was Marvan Atapattu of Sri Lanka. Apparently, when he got his first run in Test cricket, it was really a leg bye which the umpire didn't signal so he should have had 6 consecutive ducks!
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#9
(20-07-2009, 10:41 AM)DD BEAR Wrote: Thanks, beats Kims 2000th about the juggler.


You dont remember a lot Paul.

I remember your name

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